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26

Tower in Siloam


<< Luke 13 >>
King James Version  
1There were present at that season some that told him of the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. 

2And Jesus answering said unto them, Suppose ye that these Galilaeans were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they suffered such things? 

3I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish. 

4Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem? 

5I tell you, Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.


Luke 13:2-3  
Suppose ye ... - From this answer it would appear that they supposed that the fact that these men had been slain in this manner proved that they were very great sinners.
I tell you, Nay - Jesus assured them that it was not right to draw such a conclusion respecting these men. The fact that men come to a sudden and violent death is not proof that they are especially wicked.
Except ye repent - Except you forsake your sins and turn to God. Jesus took occasion, contrary to their expectation, to make a practical use of that fact, and to warn them of their own danger. He never suffered a suitable occasion to pass without warning the wicked, and entreating them to forsake their evil ways. The subject of religion was always present to his mind. He introduced it easily, freely, fully. In this he showed his love for the souls of people, and in this he set us an example that we should walk in his steps.
Ye shall all likewise perish - You shall all be destroyed in a similar manner. Here he had reference, no doubt, to the calamities that were coming upon them, when thousands of the people perished. Perhaps there was never any reproof more delicate and yet more severe than this. They came to him believing that these men who had perished were especially wicked. He did not tell them that “they” were as bad as the Galileans, but left them to “infer” it, for if they did not repent, they must soon likewise be destroyed. This was remarkably fulfilled. Many of the Jews were slain in the temple; many while offering sacrifice; thousands perished in a way very similar to the Galileans. Compare the notes at Matt. 24. From this account of the Galileans we may learn:
(1) That people are very prone to infer, when any great calamity happens to others, that they are especially guilty. See the Book of Job, and the reasonings of his three “friends.”
(2) that that conclusion, in the way in which it is usually drawn, is erroneous. If we see a man bloated, and haggard, and poor, who is in the habit of intoxication, we may infer properly that he is guilty, and that God hates his sin and punishes it. So we may infer of the effects of licentiousness. But we should not thus infer when a man’s house is burned down, or when his children die, or when he is visited with a loss of health; nor should we infer it of the nations that are afflicted with famine, or the plague, or with the ravages of war; nor should we infer it when a man is killed by lightning, or when he perishes by the blowing up of a steamboat. Those who thus perish may be far more virtuous than many that live.
(3) this is not a world of retribution. Good and evil are mingled; the good and the bad suffer, and all are exposed here to calamity


<< Acts 12 >>
King James 2000 Bible  
Herod Kills James the Brother of John


1Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to persecute certain of the church.


2And he killed James the brother of John with the sword.


3And because he saw it pleased the Jews, he proceeded further to take Peter also. (Then were the days of unleavened bread.)


4And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four squads of soldiers to keep him; intending after the passover to bring him forth to the people.


Peter Set Free From Prison


5Peter therefore was kept in prison: but prayer was made without ceasing of the church unto God for him.


6And when Herod would have brought him forth, the same night Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains: and the guards before the door kept the prison.


7And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon him, and a light shined in the prison: and he struck Peter on the side, and raised him up, saying, Arise up quickly. And his chains fell off from his hands.


8And the angel said unto him, Gird yourself, and bind on your sandals. And so he did. And he said unto him, Cast your garment about you, and follow me.


9And he went out, and followed him; and knew not that it was true which was done by the angel; but thought he saw a vision.


10When they were past the first and the second guard, they came unto the iron gate that leads unto the city; which opened to them of its own accord: and they went out, and passed on through one street; and immediately the angel departed from him.


11And when Peter had come to himself, he said, Now I know of a surety, that the Lord has sent his angel, and has delivered me out of the hand of Herod, and from all the expectation of the people of the Jews.


12And when he had considered the thing, he came to the house of Mary the mother of John, whose surname was Mark; where many were gathered together praying.


13And as Peter knocked at the door of the gate, a maid came to answer, named Rhoda.


14And when she knew Peter's voice, she opened not the gate for gladness, but ran in, and told how Peter stood before the gate.


15And they said unto her, You are mad. But she continued to affirm that it was so. Then they said, It is his angel.


16But Peter continued knocking: and when they had opened the door, and saw him, they were astonished.


17But he, beckoning unto them with the hand to hold their peace, declared unto them how the Lord had brought him out of the prison. And he said, Go show these things unto James, and to the brethren. And he departed, and went into another place.


18Now as soon as it was day, there was no small stir among the soldiers over what had become of Peter.


19And when Herod had sought him, and found him not, he examined the guards, and commanded that they should be put to death. And he went down from Judea to Caesarea, and there abode.


God's Angel Kills Herod


20And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon: but they came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace; because their country was fed by the king's country.


21And upon a set day Herod, arrayed in royal apparel, sat upon his throne, and made an oration unto them.


22And the people gave a shout, saying, It is the voice of a god, and not of a man.


23And immediately the angel of the Lord smote him, because he gave not God the glory: and he was eaten of worms, and died.


24But the word of God grew and multiplied.


25And Barnabas and Saul returned from Jerusalem, when they had fulfilled their ministry, and took with them John, whose surname was Mark.

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