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07

2 THE TEN OFFENSES
T H E MA Y F L O W E R CO M PA C T
Thirteen years later, another band of English settlers sailed on a
boat called the Mayflower and reached Cape Cod on the Atlantic
coastline of what later became the state of Massachusetts. After
coming ashore in November of 1620, they drafted a foundational
document known as the Mayflower Compact, which historians tell
us was the first formal document for self-government drafted in
America. Here is what it said (emphases added):
In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten,
the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord,
King James, by the Grace of God, of England, France and Ireland,
King, Defender of the Faith, . . . Having undertaken for
the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith,
and the Honor of our King and Country, a voyage to plant
the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia; do by these
presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and
one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a
civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation,
and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; and by Virtue hereof
to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal Laws,
Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to
time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the
General good of the Colony; unto which we promise all due
submission and obedience. In Witness whereof we have hereunto
subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of
November, in the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James
of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland
the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini, 1620.
Again, contemporary political correctness and revisionist history
notwithstanding, the founders of the United States of America did
Founding a Christian Nation 3
so to “advance the Christian faith and bring glory to God.” Some
today may not like that fact, but it is true nonetheless.
It would have been unthinkable that the teaching of the Holy
Bible, which laid out the concepts of Christianity and, in turn, the
views of “just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and
offices,” would be denied to children in their schools or stripped
from the public square by court orders in subsequent years.
T H E C H A R T E R O F MA S S A C H U S E T T S B A Y
To underscore their clear intentions, these Mayflower settlers, and
those who came later, set forth the full scope of their concept of
government—including a governor, legislature, and various courts
—in what was called the Charter of Massachusetts Bay. In this
charter, they included these words, “ . . . whereby our said people,
inhabitants there, may be so religiously, peaceably, and civilly governed,
as their good life and orderly conversation may win and
incite the natives of country, to the knowledge and obedience of
the only true God and Savior of mankind and the Christian faith”
(emphasis added).
This new nation was not polytheistic, multicultural, Islamic,
Hindu, Buddhist, animist, or atheistic. It was a Christian nation
intended to be governed by religious people who were guided by
the precepts of the Holy Bible.
In 1663, the Charter for Rhode Island and Providence described
their founders as people who were “pursuing with peaceable and
loyal minds, their sober, serious and religious intentions, of godly
edifying themselves, and one another, in the holy Christian faith
and worship as they were persuaded” (emphasis added).
Written ninety-four years after the founding of Jamestown, the
Delaware Charter of 1701 expressly states: “Almighty God being
the only Lord of Conscience, Father of Lights and Spirits; and the
Author as well as object of all divine Knowledge, Faith, and Wor-
4 THE TEN OFFENSES
ship, who only doth enlighten the Minds, and persuade and convenience
the Understandings of People . . . And that all persons who
also profess to believe in Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world, shall
be capable . . . to serve this government in any capacity, both legislatively
and executively . . . ” (emphasis added).
T H I R T E E N C O L O N I E S B A S E D O N FA I T H
From 1607 until 1776, thirteen colonies came into being in this new
land. By 1776, there were an estimated three million inhabitants of
the thirteen colonial states, of which some 2,500 were Jewish (according
to the World Jewish Congress), a handful were atheists and
agnostics, and the remainder were primarily Protestant Christians.
Although the colonies’ leaders had studied the writings of contemporary
European philosophers as well as the sages of Greece
and Rome, their concepts of ordered liberty, the dignity of the individual,
the proper role of government, and true private and public
morality came from the Bible. The great thinkers of the Reformation,
especially John Calvin and Martin Luther, and expository
sermons preached by gifted men of God throughout the land, were
also pivotal to their thinking. Without an understanding of the
Bible, especially the Ten Commandments of Moses the great lawgiver,
it is impossible to understand the constitutions, the laws, and
the customs of either colonial or modern America.
Some 169 years after the founding of Jamestown, the new nation
was confronted with an intolerable situation. King George III of
England, who was an autocratic tyrant, and the British Parliament,
which was led by Lord North, considered the American colonies
not as a prized part of the British Empire but as a cash cow to be repeatedly
milked of its wealth to support the government of England.
The colonists were taxed on the importations of silk, linen, manufactured
goods, gunpowder, and tea, as well as the exportation of
tobacco and other agricultural products. To add further indignity,
Founding a Christian Nation 5
the colonists were required to quarter British troops in their homes
and to pay taxes to support them. Although each colony had its
own legislature, those legislative bodies had little voice in setting
taxes. The British Parliament set taxes on the colonies and then
ratcheted them up with studied indifference to the suffering they
caused. Frequent colonial petitions were rebuffed or ignored by the
government in London. So seething discontent began to bubble
over into talk of rebellion. The abuses were clear, and the rallying
cry of the colonists was equally clear: “Taxation without representation
is tyranny.”
T H E D E C L A R AT I O N O F I N D E P E N D E N C E
An assembly of distinguished representatives from each of the thirteen
American colonies assembled in Philadelphia in the summer of
1776 to catalogue their grievances and to submit a declaration setting
forth the reasons that the thirteen English colonies in America
should become a separate nation, independent from their mother
country, England.
The vast majority of these representatives were Christians! All
had been taught the Bible. In their declaration, they spoke of truths
that were “self-evident.” The first “self-evident truth” was that all
men are created equal. They all assumed the biblical concept of
creation.
They understood that God had created a world order in which
all people, regardless of race or religious heritage, held the right to
“life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” And what is the “pursuit
of happiness?” It is none other than personal fulfillment by
each individual, without hindrance by government, of the purposes
for which he or she has been created. I can only presume that those
who drafted the Declaration of Independence were familiar with
God’s words to the prophet Jeremiah: “Before I formed you in the
womb I knew you, . . . I appointed you as a prophet to the nations”
6 THE TEN OFFENSES
(Jeremiah 1:5). Finding that ordained purpose, just as Jeremiah did,
will indeed bring happiness and is man’s highest goal.
Historians believe that John Adams, our second president, who
was a dedicated Christian and learned Bible scholar, formulated the
essential concepts of the Declaration. Adams recommended that
Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, a man highly regarded for the felicity
of his writing, draft the language of the document.
FA I T H AT T H E C E N T E R O F I N D E P E N D E N C E
And so it was that on July 4, 1776, my collateral ancestor, Benjamin
Harrison, was the presiding officer when the delegates pledged
their lives to the cause of freedom and signed the Declaration of
Independence for what was to become the United States of America.
At our independence, our rallying cry as a nation sprang from the
firm conviction that we should fight for the liberty that had been
given to each one of us by our Creator—God. In the twenty-first
century, we would do well to remember that the essential support
of our liberty is our faith in God. Strip away the affirmation of faith
in God from the public arena, and the only support of liberty
standing against the armed might of cruel tyrants is the fickle
passion of public opinion.
The Declaration of Independence sets forth in clear but peaceable
language the abuses inflicted by England on its colonies in
North America and the reasons that the colonists deemed it necessary
to sever the formal ties with their mother country. The British
government could have acceded to the colonists’ request, granted
them independence, and entered into a treaty of friendship, comity,
and beneficial trade with the colonies. Instead, the British regarded
the Declaration of Independence as an act of rebellion to be crushed
by force of arms. Each hostile act of the British thereafter merely
served to harden the colonists’ resolve.
Eloquent Virginia statesman Patrick Henry echoed the prevailing
Founding a Christian Nation 7
sentiment of his fellow countrymen when he thundered forth: “Is life
so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and
slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what others may do,
but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.”
Many died in the cause of freedom. The suffering of the American
colonists and their soldiers on the battlefield was intense.
C O L O N I S T S P R A Y F O R G O D ’ S P R O T E C T I O N
Yet on two notable instances, what seemed like miracles saved the
colonial armies from annihilation. Here are the stories of what
actually happened.
General George Washington’s men had fought valiantly to prevent
a British takeover of New York. Despite their heroism, the
American forces had been pushed to the water’s edge in Brooklyn
at the western tip of Long Island. By nightfall, the British had
moved into position to annihilate the Americans the following
morning. But during the night, a dense fog moved into the area. By
morning, the fog completely shielded Washington’s forces from
British sight. Slowly but surely, every man, every artillery piece,
and every horse was quietly loaded on boats and barges and ferried
across the Hudson River to the safety of New Jersey, where the
Americans could resupply and fight on. Later that morning, when
the fog lifted and the British sprung the trap they had so carefully
put in place, they found not one single American remaining. All
had escaped because of what the American forces believed was a
direct miracle of God.
Later in the war, a second miraculous event occurred. Lord
Cornwallis of England had taken a position on the riverbank in
Yorktown, Virginia. The sea lanes at the mouth of the river were
blockaded by a French fleet that had arrived to help the Americans.
Cornwallis was surrounded, but he knew aid was coming to him by
way of a large British force from the south. Again, as was the case on
8 THE TEN OFFENSES
Long Island, a dense fog settled over the river at Yorktown, making
maneuvers by the British ships impossible. Cornwallis realized
that without reinforcements, his situation was untenable. Facing a
crushing defeat, he did the wise thing and surrendered his army to
Washington, ending what we know as the Revolutionary War.
The colonists had offered fervent prayers to God. And, despite
all human reason to the contrary, they believed God had sustained
them, blessed them, and miraculously delivered them, helping them
to defeat the armies of the most powerful nation on earth.
G O D I N T H E C O N S T I T U T I O N
Eleven years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence,
delegates from the thirteen states met again in Philadelphia to craft
a constitution for “a more perfect union” than they had known
under the loose Articles of Confederation, which had been their
governing charter following the Revolutionary War.
The Constitution for the emerging United States of America
was signed by George Washington on September 17, “in the year of
our Lord” 1787. To those who say that there is no mention of God
or Jesus Christ in the Constitution, I ask this question: Which
“Lord” was Washington referring to? Lord North? King George,
Lord of England? Or was it the Lord Jesus Christ, who was born
1,787 years previously and whose birth became the point of reference
for all Western calendars—those events “Before Christ” (BC)
and those events “Anno Domini” (AD), the year of our Lord?
Having signed “in the year of our Lord,” Washington was faced
with no protest, no minority report, and no claim that the rights of
non-Christians were being violated. When he affirmed in the Constitution
that Jesus Christ was Lord of the assembled delegates, and
in fact of the entire nation, no dissent was forthcoming because this
statement was a fact not in dispute at the time of the signing of the
Constitution of the United States.
Founding a Christian Nation 9
The Constitution drafted by the Constitutional Convention in
1787 could not become effective unless ratified by at least threefourths
of the states. The states wanted a strong, effective central
government, but they insisted on a bill of rights that would prevent
the proposed national legislature from trampling individual liberties
or the clear prerogatives of the states.
“ C O N G R E S S S H A L L MA K E N O L AW . . . ”
James Madison of Virginia—who studied theology at Princeton
University under the great minister statesman John Witherspoon—
along with fellow Virginian George Mason, was asked to draft ten
amendments to the Constitution in a fashion not unlike the Ten Commandments
of Moses. These amendments, later known as the Bill of
Rights, began with the First Amendment, which says, “Congress shall
make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting
the free exercise thereof . . .” Clearly, the First Amendment was a
restriction on Congress, not the states or any individual or group of
individuals.
Several of the states had established churches that were similar to
the Church of England. Virginia had just struggled free from the
oppression of an established church where non-Anglicans experienced
mild persecution. All of the colonists were familiar with the
persecution and bloodshed resulting from overly zealous secular
governments using coercion to force a state religion on their citizens.
After numerous attempts to draft language prohibiting the
establishment of a national church, Madison wrote, “Congress shall
make no law respecting an establishment of religion.” He clearly
meant a state church where ministers draw salaries from the government,
bishops serve in the legislature, and people are taxed and
otherwise burdened to support the established church’s buildings,
employees, and activities.
So the First Amendment prohibits the national Congress from
10 THE TEN OFFENSES
establishing a national religion, sponsored and funded by the national
government, or from “prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”
Clearly, the national government (and its agencies) is not allowed to
hinder, fine, imprison, or unduly restrict citizens in their expression
of religion. There is no debate here regarding the prohibition. But
this in no way undermines the fact that Christianity was by design
part of the very fabric of the new federal government. And we
should note that it was this new government, established on Christian
principles, not on humanistic ideals, that created unprecedented
freedoms for all religious faiths.
In the next chapter, I will show how the United States Supreme
Court and lesser federal courts have used this First Amendment
establishment of religion prohibition, which actually dealt with the
role of Congress, to launch a vicious vendetta against all forms of
public affirmation of faith in our nation.
T H E “ES TA B L I S H M E N T C L A U S E ”
How did the first Congress regard the First Amendment establishment
of religion clause? They treated it as the language specified,
and they took great pains not to set up a national church.
On entering the newly formed House of Representatives, James
Madison, who had written the First Amendment, served as chairman
of the committee to choose a paid chaplain to open each session
of the House with prayer. Madison, who knew better than
anyone the constitutional prohibition against an “establishment of
religion,” clearly did not feel that using public funds to pay a Christian
chaplain to lead the Congress in prayer in any way violated the
prohibition.
Nor did the vote in the Continental Congress to appropriate
funds to pay for the importing of 20,000 Bibles (due to what the
Library of Congress records as a shortage caused by the Revolutionary
War) violate what later became the First Amendment. Nor
Founding a Christian Nation 11
did the use of the Capitol Rotunda for Christian Sunday worship
services appear in any way to establish a religion in contravention
of the First Amendment.
As Thomas Jefferson put it in his second inaugural address, “I
have not attempted to prescribe any form of worship for the federal
government, but I have left the matter as the Constitution found it
with the states and the several religious bodies” (emphasis added).
Implicit in this remark is the sense that Thomas Jefferson could, if
he had so desired, set up a form of worship for federal employees in
the new central government without that act being considered an
“establishment of religion.”
The founding fathers recognized that religious faith was the
essential underpinning of this new nation. In 1798 John Adams,
who some consider the chief architect of the Constitution, remarked,
“We have no government armed with power capable of
contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion.
Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry would break the strongest
cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution
is designed only for a moral and religious people. It is
wholly inadequate for any other.”
Adams recognized that the “unbridled passions” of unregenerate
people could only be controlled by the force of tyranny.
Democratic self-government with maximum freedom was only
possible to people who had restrained their basic instincts by selfregulating
morality and religious belief.
O U R F O U N D E R S A N D T H E I R FA I T H
Our first president, George Washington, was a dedicated Christian,
and he echoed the sentiment of Adams in his farewell address when
he said, “Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national
morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”
In short, it was clear to the wise leaders at the founding of the
12 THE TEN OFFENSES
United States that the fear of God and the restraining hand of God’s
commandments prohibit people from murder, theft, adultery, immorality,
perjury, and rebellion by the young. The generations of
those who laid the legal, economic, and moral foundation of this
land knew well the warning of King Solomon, who had written,
“Without a vision of God, the people run amok” (Proverbs 29:18,
author’s translation). Without such a vision of a Creator—of ultimate
reward and ultimate punishment—only martial law and armed
restraint can prevent anarchy and mayhem.
Following the establishment of the federal union, each state
adopted its own constitution. The constitution of every one of our
fifty states includes a reference to God or Almighty God or divine
guidance. Without question, the God referred to is not Allah or
Brahma or Shiva or the Great Spirit. It is the Jehovah God of the
Old and New Testaments. None of these Christian references has, to
my knowledge, been challenged as an “establishment of religion.”
Each clearly indicates that the veneration of the Creator God is an
integral part of the fabric of this nation.
I am including the references from the state constitutions in the
appendix of this book. For illustration, here are a few of the references
(emphases added):
C A L I F O R N I A
(Preamble)—We, the People of the State of California,
grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure
and perpetuate its blessings, do establish this Constitution.
C O LO RA D O
(Preamble)—We, the people of Colorado, with profound
reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, in order to
form a more independent and perfect government; establish
justice; insure tranquility; provide for the common defense;
Founding a Christian Nation 13
promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty
to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish
this constitution for the “State of Colorado.”
F L O R I D A
(Preamble)—We, the people of the State of Florida, being
grateful to Almighty God for our constitutional liberty, in
order to secure its benefits, perfect our government, insure
domestic tranquility, maintain public order, and guarantee
equal civil and political rights to all, do ordain and establish
this constitution.
I L L I N O I S
(Preamble)—We, the People of the State of Illinois—
grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious
liberty which He has permitted us to enjoy and seeking His
blessing upon our endeavors—in order to provide for the
health, safety and welfare of the people; maintain a representative
and orderly government; eliminate poverty and inequality;
assure legal, social and economic justice; provide opportunity
for the fullest development of the individual; insure domestic
tranquility; provide for the common defense; and secure the
blessings of freedom and liberty to ourselves and our posterity—
do ordain and establish this Constitution for the State of
Illinois.
I O WA
(Preamble)—We the people of the state of Iowa, grateful
to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and
feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of those
blessings, do ordain and establish a free and independent
government, by the name of the State of Iowa.
14 THE TEN OFFENSES
MA S S A C H U S E T T S
. . . We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging,
with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator
of the universe, in affording us, in the course of His
providence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without
fraud, violence or surprise, of entering into an original,
explicit, and solemn compact with each other; and of forming
a new constitution of civil government, for ourselves and
posterity; and devoutly imploring His direction in so interesting
a design, do agree upon, ordain and establish the following
Declaration of Rights, and Frame of Government, as
the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
(Article II)—It is the right as well as the duty of all men
in society, publicly, and at stated seasons to worship the
Supreme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe.
And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained,
in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the
manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own
conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided
he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others
in their religious worship.
(Article III)—As the happiness of a people, and the good
order and preservation of civil government, essentially depend
upon piety, religion and morality; and as these cannot be
generally diffused through a community, but by the institution
of the public worship of God, and of public instructions in
piety, religion and morality: Therefore, to promote their happiness
and to secure the good order and preservation of their
government, the people of this commonwealth have a right
to invest their legislature with power to authorize and require,
and the legislature shall, from time to time, authorize
and require, the several towns, parishes, precincts, and other
Founding a Christian Nation 15
bodies politic, or religious societies, to make suitable provision,
at their own expense, for the institution of the public
worship of God, and for the support and maintenance of public
Protestant teachers or piety, religion and morality, in all
cases where such provision shall not be made voluntarily.
O H I O
(Preamble)—We, the people of the State of Ohio, grateful
to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and
promote our common welfare, do establish this Constitution.
This was America from its founding, through its revolution,
through its growth from East to West, and to its rise as the most
powerful nation on earth. America was a nation whose institutions,
according to the Supreme Court case of Zorach v. Clausen in 1952,
“presuppose the existence of a Supreme Being.”
Despite injustice, despite corruption and bribery, despite a
bloody Civil War, despite Reconstruction, this nation assented to
a belief in Almighty God, to Jesus Christ as the Son of God, to the
Holy Bible, and to the Ten Commandments of God as the acknowledged
standard of human conduct.
We will see in the next chapter how a tiny minority of so-called
elite, secular liberals decided to make a sneak attack on the source
of American greatness by using the courts to destroy our spiritual
heritage.
16 THE TEN OFFENSES
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saikocattt
Sunday, October 23, 2011 9:44 AM
Nice
mcgarvie
# mcgarvie
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 11:16 AM
Africa! America!

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